Monday, March 15, 2010

How I became a climate change denier.

I wasn't always a denier. I believed that a small "c" conservative approach was to avoid doing the irreversible. However, a series of incidents changed my mind. I didn't bother digging up the links. If you're curious, just Google it.

First, the East Anglia E-mails. Spin it how you like, but on the face they demonstrate politics, not science.

Second, the U.N. report on the Himalayan glaciers being based on a single article in an Indian magazine, that quoted a single scientist, and they transposed the date from 2350 to 2035? That is, at best, extremely shoddy workmanship.

Third, I was reading in Foreign Affairs about black carbon, which causes 25-50% of global warming. It is short-lived, so an change we do today would have an effect tomorrow, unlike carbon dioxide, which is a decades-long project. The real kicker is we can cheaply deal with it with technology we already have without needing to reorganize our society. If those in power were serious about global warming, and not just using it as a political hobby horse, this is where the attention would go.

Fourth, the systematic deletion of temperature sensors from high latitude and altitude. Crippling our data sets in a biased way? Gee, that's not suspicious.

Fifth, the editing of hundreds of Wikipedia articles to remove references to the Medieval Warm Period.


You can explain away any one of these, but the five of them forms a trend in my mind. It'll take a heck of a lot to win back my confidence.

3 Comments:

OpenID bruce-church said...

I didn't hear about the Wiki deletions. I see this page on the MWP. Perhaps it was reinstated intact?:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_Warm_Period

10:43 PM  
Blogger Prof. Roger Kovaciny said...

Actually, Bruce, there were THOUSANDS of Wiki articles, not hundreds. I remember reading the article about it just a month or two ago.

Isn't it astonishing how the liberal agenda requires lies and hysteria to advance it?

2:20 AM  
OpenID bruce-church said...

Yes, I see there was repression of the MWP information, and of GW skepticism in general. Here's two articles:

Lawrence Solomon: Wikipedia’s climate doctor
http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fpcomment/archive/2009/12/18/lawrence-solomon-wikipedia-s-climate-doctor.aspx

Wikibullies at work. The National Post exposes broad trust issues over Wikipedia climate information
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/12/19/wikibullies-at-work-the-national-post-exposes-broad-trust-issues-over-wikipedia-climate-information/

3:10 PM  

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