Saturday, September 11, 2010

God is Imaginary: #22 Rebuttal

This post is addressing the objections to the last post in this series, #22 Count all the People God wants to Murder.


"Deserved to die" is different from "wants them killed."

I concur, and Scripture even supports that interpretation. In Genesis 15:16, concerning the entry into Canaan, God said, "In the fourth generation your descendants will come back here, for the sin of the Amorites has not yet reached its full measure." Though they already deserved to die, after all, "the wages of sin is death," it wasn't until generations later that they had become so thoroughly corrupted that God would command that they be killed.


In this case, the answer is as you say -- it's for the benefit of the believers carrying out the orders. Apparently murder builds character.

Once again it depends on who you are. A soldier who refuses combat is a bad soldier, whatever else he may be. A people who are commanded to rid evil from a land would be wrong not to do so.


Then ask yourself, 'Why am I comfortable worshiping a God who acts nice now, but in the past basically presided over a reign of terror?'"

I am comfortable because there is the ceaseless distinction between Law and Gospel. There's a story about Robert E. Lee having a soldier brought before him for a court martial. The soldier was quivering and Lee said, "Don't worry, son, you'll get justice here." The soldier replied, "I know, sir, that's what I'm afraid of." In the Old Testament, we saw the consequences of a just God. It is, and should be, enough to terrify us. In the New Testament, the pure mercy of Godis added to his justice, and as the hymn writer said, "All my fears relieved." It is very hard to understand how David could sing of the love of God with only the Old Testament to go on.


And that "It's logically impossible to keep the Sabbath but that's still your fault" is bullshit, as I've said before. That's the system designer's fault, not the occupants'.

By no means. The reason sin has become unavoidable is because of sin. It is both the cause and the consequence. Would you prefer that God ceaselessly intervene to prevent you from sinning, when he created a perfect world and we still failed?

Back to the 50 Reasons.

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