Friday, September 24, 2010

A Heathen Reads the Bible

Noumenon linked me to the blog A Heathen Reads the Bible, which I am enjoying greatly. I'm not going to criticize it seriously, because it's not serious criticism, but I do have a few random comments:

why 'we can't just train all the animals to be vegetarian'


We can, sometimes. A lot of them have just lost the ability, or the particular plant species, to pursue that diet.

I always wondered why people didn't infer from this story that learning second languages is against God's will; mostly this thought came to me as a fond fantasy in the middle of Spanish class.

Now consider that God reversed the Tower of Babel at Pentacost.

but I have NO idea where Jacob got this silly branch idea..."Am I missing something huge or is this story just completely pointless?"

It seems that God launched the first "come as you are" party, and accepted all varieties of paganism in his converts (though that was rapidly purged out of them).

These random details do add realism to the story, though. The writer's adage, reality doesn't have to make sense, appears to apply. The striped sticks? Never referred to again. Why put it in there? Because it happened. Wouldn't you be much more suspicious of a Murder on the Orient Express style drama were the tiniest detail was crucial to the plot? A lot of butterflies flap their wings without causing hurricanes.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Roger Kovaciny said...

The point of the striped sticks was that Jacob did the best he knew how at the time to help the outcome he desired. Sympathetic magic (as this is called) was all around him and was used like it is today to stop global warming, make rain fall, and in this case to encourage the birth of spotted and striped lambs and kids. If God hadn't been involved--and showed that He was involved through the granting of a vision in a dream--he would have concluded "Well, that's one magic trick that didn't work." The point is that Jacob didn't just pray and then leave his hands folded. He prayed and got to work. Both are usually required for the outcome that's desired.

2:02 AM  

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