Sunday, February 05, 2012

How to Make a Misleading Chart without being Accused of Favoritism

First, look at the chart in the second section of this BBC article.

Second, tell me what's wrong with it. Obviously, Ron Paul, who came in third, is listed last on the chart. Even though the percentages are listed, the visual impact of the chart is that Ron Paul is last.

Here's where it gets tricky: they can justify displaying the information in this way because they alphabetized the list--by FIRST name--but the chart itself only displays the candidates' LAST NAMES.

The statistics for the chart were provided by the Nevada Republican Party. You can draw your own conclusions on that one.

4 Comments:

Blogger Yoel Natan said...

I assume that they ordered it by who has the most delegate votes overall. Ron Paul is last of the four in that department.

12:35 AM  
Blogger Yoel Natan said...

http://projects.wsj.com/campaign2012/delegates

12:36 AM  
Blogger Octavo Dia said...

No, because the chart is labeled "Nevada Caucus Results." It *shouldn't* include totals from other states.

6:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Second, tell me what's wrong with it. Obviously, Ron Paul, who came in third, is listed last on the chart. Even though the percentages are listed, the visual impact of the chart is that Ron Paul is last.

2:06 AM  

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